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Could synchrotron light sources benefit from the CERN experience with beams split in horizontal phase space?

This talk reviews the recent activities carried out at CERN in terms of transverse beam splitting with proton beams. Thanks to intense experimental and theoretical activities, the recently-proposed approach of splitting beams in the horizontal phase space using stable islands moved out of the test stage to beoame a mature technique of beam manipulation to perform multi-turn extraction. It is therefore timely to address the question whether stable islands can be applied to other branches of accelerator physics, in view of bringing new means of improving ring’s performance. This is the case of synchrotron light machines, where the use of stable islands could lead to new developments that will be presented and discussed.

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Nanoscience and Nanotechnology

The NEXT Nanotechnology group at INFN – LNF organizes since 2000 a series of international meetings in the area of nanotechnology. The conference in 2018 is devoted to recent developments in nanoscience and its manifold technological applications. It consists of a number of tutorial/keynote lectures, as well as research talks presenting frontier nanoscience research developments and innovative nanotechnologies in the areas of biology, medicine, aerospace, optoelectronics, energy, materials and characterizations, low-dimensional nanostructures and devices. We plan to submit selected papers, based on conference talks and related discussions, for publication on a dedicated issue of a MDPI journal (to be specified later). There will be Invited Lecturers and selected talks from the call for papers below, as well as a poster session. CALL FOR CONTRIBUTIONS Authors wishing to submit their work for presentation at the conference can send an abstract as a doc or pdf file (max. 3 pages) to bellucci@lnf.infn.it by 5th December 2018, specifying whether it is meant for oral or poster presentation. Authors will be notified of the acceptance of their submission by 7th December 2018. LOC: S. Bellucci (Chair), S. Bistarelli, O. Calamai, A. Cataldo, F. Micciulla, M. Regi IAC: G. Bussetti (Polytechnic University of Milan, Italy), P. Kuzhir (Belarus State University, Minsk, Belarus), I. Iavicoli (University of Neaples, Italy) J. Macutkevic (Vilnius University, Lithuania) A. Maffucci (University of Cassino, Italy) S. Maksimenko (Belarus State University, Minsk, Belarus), D. Mencarelli (Polytechnic University of Marche, Italy) M. Modreanu (Tyndall Micronano Electronics, University College Cork, Ireland) M. Meyyappan (Ames ...

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7th Rome Joint Workshop: Current topics in Particle Physics

Aim of the workshop: The workshop will deal with several open issues in high-energy physics in the era of the LHC. We shall discuss topics ranging from Standard Model (QCD) phenomenology to fashionable new physics models, such as supersymmetry or Dark Matter theories. Most speakers will be young fellows working or collaborating with the phenomenology groups in the Rome area. All talks will be presented in a pedagogical way and plenty of time will be scheduled to allow discussion among participants. Scientific Program and Speakers: Robert Ziegler (CERN) "DM photon effective operators" Matthew Kirk  (INFN Roma) "Hints of new physics in flavour anomalies" Paolo Panci (CERN) "Bounds on Dark Matter Annihilations from 21-cm data"  Fred Bjorkeroth  (INFN LNF) "Peccei-Quinn Symmetry as a Flavor Symmetry" Luca Marzola (NICPB, Tallin) "The dark side of neutron stars" Filippo Sala (DESY)    "Beyond WIMPs at neutrino experiments: heavy and light Dark Matter" Federica Giacchino  (INFN LNF) "A new Simplified Dark Matter Model: the Vector-like Portal" Marco Bonvini (INFN Roma) ''New insights on the proton's structure'' Ramona Groeber (HUMBOLDT U., Berlin) "Future probes of the Higgs boson" Pier Paolo Giardino (IFT Madrid) "Variation of alpha from a DM force" Luca Vecchi  (Lausanne) "Model Building and Un-Naturalness" Ennio Salvioni   (Munich Tech. U.) "Composite PNGB Dark Matter"   Some funds are available to support participation of INFN  researchers, postdocs and associates. To inquire please contact: enrico.nardi@lnf.infn.it   

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Spin-azimuthal asymmetries in SIDIS: from JLab12 to EIC

The study of the 3D nucleon structure by probing the transverse momentum dependent (TMD) distributions of partons in Semi-Inclusive DIS is widely accepted as one of the main goals of the future Electron Ion Collider (EIC). Much wider kinematical coverage, and in particular higher $P_T$ and $Q^2$, would allow validating and extending studies of evolution properties of TMDs planned at JLab12, and access the sea and gluon distributions. The EIC would allow much better separation of current fragmentation and target fragmentation regions than JLab12, and due to high polarization of electrons and protons is a natural choice for measurements of different spin dependent observables in a full range of accessible kinematics. EIC provides also a unique possibility for detection of hadrons produced in the target fragmentation region, providing a new avenue for studies of the non-perturbative structure of the nucleon in correlations of hadrons produced in DIS regime. In this talk, we present an overview of the current status and some future measurements of the orbital structure of nucleons and nuclei at JLab and EIC.

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DAFNE-TF Workshop 2018

ICFA Mini-Workshop on   DAFNE as Open Accelerator Test Facility in year 2020 The workshop will take place on December 17th, 2018 at the Touschek Auditorium, Frascati Laboratory of INFN, Italy. The workshop is intended to discuss the interest from scientists to access the DAFNE e+ e- complex, which will conclude its physics program as collider in 2020. An infrastructure almost unique, that could open as Test Facility (DAFNE-TF) to the international community for studies of accelerator technologies and beam physics, for small experiments, and to be used as a test bed for enterprises active in the sector of components for accelerators.  Invitation Letter of Prof. Lenny Rivkin, Chair of the International Scientific Committee  INFN-18-10-LNF – “Proposal for a possible use of DAFNE as an open infrastructure (DAFNE-TF) for the study of physics and innovative technologies for accelerators” Scientific Committee L. Rivkin (EPFL and PSI, chair), C. Bloise (INFN-LNF), Y. Cai (SLAC), A. Ghigo (INFN-LNF), M. Giovannozzi (CERN), C. Milardi (INFN-LNF), N. Pastrone (INFN-Torino), A. Variola (INFN-LNF) Organizing Committee O. R. Blanco Garcia (INFN-LNF), S. Caschera (INFN-LNF), A. De Santis (INFN-LNF), A. Drago (INFN-LNF, chair) Secretariat D. Ferrucci (INFN-LNF), M. Luciani (INFN-LNF) dafne-tfw2018@lists.lnf.infn.it   Webmaster: S. Reda

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Searching for the neutrinoless double beta decay with Gerda

Neutrinoless double beta decay is a lepton-number violating process which is predicted by many extensions of the Standard Model. It could be the key to understand the nature of the neutrino. If observed, it would prove its Majorana nature and the half-life of the decay would be a direct measure of the yet unknown absolute scale of the neutrino-mass, assuming the massive neutrino exchange as the dominant process. The GERmanium Detector Array (Gerda) experiment at the INFN, Gran Sasso Laboratory, Italy, is searching for the neutrinoless double beta decay of the isotope 76 Ge. High-purity germanium crystals enriched in 76 Ge are the source and the detector simultaneously. The key design feature of Gerda is that detectors are deployed directly into an ultrapure cryogenic liquid (liquid argon), acting both as cooling medium and radiation shield against the external radiation. After a major detector upgrade a second Phase (Phase II) of the experiment started in December 2015. Newly developed, custom-made BEGe-type germanium detectors made out of enriched material were deployed in the setup, allowing for a superior background rejection by pulse shape discrimination. The background suppression was further improved thanks to an active veto which detects the liquid argon scintillation light. This presentation will summarize the basic concept of the Gerda design, the recent physics results from Phase II, the status and future perspectives of the neutrinoless double beta decay search using 76 Ge.

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THE CUORE EXPERIMENT AT LNGS

Neutrinoless double beta decay (NDBD) is a direct probe of new physics beyond the Standard Model. Its discovery would demonstrate that the lepton number is not a symmetry of nature and would provide unique information on the nature and mass of the neutrinos. Among the possible experimental techniques, thermal detectors fulfill the requirements for a sensitive search, showing an excellent energy resolution, an almost complete independence from the isotope choice and the possibility of scaling to very large masses. Characterized by an exceptionally high natural abundance in 130-Te and excellent mechanical and thermal properties, TeO2 has long been recognized as an ideal candidate, and a number of increasing mass bolometers have been developed along the past 30 years. The Cryogenic Underground Observatory for Rare Events (CUORE) is just the latest step of this development. With a mass of 741 kg, the detector consists of an array of 988 TeO2 crystals arranged in a cylindrical compact structure of 19 towers. The installation of the 19 towers in the CUORE cryostat was completed in August 2016, followed by the cooldown to base temperature in December 2016. This result marks a fundamental milestone in low temperature detectors techniques, opening the path for future ton-scale bolometric experiments searching for rare events. CUORE has been taking science data since Spring 2017, alternating engineering and physics runs. The performance of the detector and the initial results be presented.

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A Hunt for Dark Matter: a Tale of Direction and Sensitivity

The WIMP direction at Earth undergoes a diurnal modulation that, if detected, would provide one of the most powerful and unambiguous signatures for the discovery of dark matter. Experimental efforts and ideas aimed at detecting this signature have greatly expanded in the last decade, which also saw significant technical progress overcoming a number of challenges. Despite this, the gap in limit-setting sensitivity between directional and non-directional searches has widened. Sensitivity to unexplored WIMP parameter space is, perhaps, the biggest challenge facing the directional community. In this regard, the recent prediction of an irreducible background from solar neutrinos has provided a needed impetus, leading to a resurgence in the field. Directional sensitivity provides the most robust path beyond this so called ‘neutrino-floor’. After briefly motivating the case for directionality I will focus on the experimental work in directionality by my group at UNM. Here I will begin with our work on the DRIFT experiment, which pioneered the use of negative-ion TPCs for directional DM searches. I will also describe R&D on improving directional and discrimination sensitivity with micro-patterned gas detectors. I will conclude with some new ideas that could lead to a simple, cheap and scalable path to the large volumes needed for future directional DM experiments.

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Neutrino Lines from Dark Matter

While photon lines – or monochromatic photons-are known to arise in many dark matter models, neutrino lines are not so common. In this talk, I will discuss simple dark matter models, whose main indirect detection signature is the production of monochromatic neutrinos. Such features play an important role in indirect dark matter searches because they can be better discriminated against the astrophysical background. In the first part of my talk, I will discuss decaying dark matter. In particular, I will focus on singlet majorons, which naturally produce neutrino lines. Then, in the second part,I will briefly describe the properties that simple models must have in order to produce, in the near future,an observable flux of neutrino lines from dark matter annihilations. In both parts, I will discuss the implications for neutrino telescopes and the interplay with other indirect detection channels.

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Fermilab: Muon g-2 and other news.

After 50 years of operation, Fermilab is still going strong. I will discuss the motivation, status, and prospects of the FNAL g-2 experiment. I’ll place it in historical context, especially regarding Fermilab’s future programs. I will end with a brief explanation of Fermilab’s “smallest” experiment, the Holometer, which measures effect of Planck-scale physics.

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